The End of a Physics Worldview (Kauffman)

Thought provoking, as usual. This video goes beyond his previous work, but in the same direction. His point is that it is a mistake to think of ecologies and economies as if they resembled the typical world of Physics. A previous written version is at npr, followed by a later development.

He builds on Kant’s notion of wholes, noting (as Kant did before him) that the existence of such wholes is inconsistent with classical notions of causality.  He ties this in to biological examples. This complements Prigogine, who did a similar job for modern Physics.

Kauffman is critical of mathematics and ‘mathematization’, but seems unaware of the mathematics of Keynes and Whitehead. Kauffman’s view seems the same as that due to Bergson and Smuts, which in the late 1920s defined ‘modern science’. To me the problem behind the financial crash lies not in science or mathematics or even in economics, but in the brute fact that politicians and financiers were wedded to a pre-modern (pre-Kantian) view of economics and mathematics. Kauffman’s work may help enlighten them on the need, but not on the potential role for modern mathematics.

Kauffman notes that at any one time there are ‘adjacent possibles’ and that in the near future they may come to pass, and that – conceptually – one could associate a probability distribution with these possibilities. But as new possibilities come to pass new adjacent possibilities arise. Kauffman supposes that it is not possible to know what these are, and hence one cannot have a probability distribution, much of information theory makes no sense, and one cannot reason effectively. The challenge, then, is to discover how we do, in fact, reason.

Kauffman does not distinguish between short and long run. If we do so then we see that if we know the adjacent possible then our conventional reasoning is appropriate in the short-term, and Kauffman’s concerns are really about the long-term: beyond the point at which we can see the potential possibles that may arise. To this extent, at least, Kauffman’s post-modern vision seems little different from the modern vision of the 1920s and 30s, before it was trivialized.

Dave Marsay

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About Dave Marsay
Mathematician with an interest in 'good' reasoning.

One Response to The End of a Physics Worldview (Kauffman)

  1. Pingback: How mathematical modelling seduced Wall Street (NS) « djmarsay

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