Reasoning and natural selection

Cosmides, L. & Tooby, J. (1991). Reasoning and natural selection. Encyclopedia of Human Biology, vol. 6. San Diego: Academic Press

Summary

Argues that logical reasoning, by which it seems to mean classical induction and symbolic reasoning, are not favoured by evolution. Instead one has reasoning particular to the social context. It argues that in typical situations it is either not possible or not practical to consider ‘all hypotheses’, and that the generation of hypotheses to consider is problematic. It argues that this is typically done using implicit specific theories. Has a discussion of the ‘green and blue cabs’ example.

Comment

 In real situations one can assume induction and lacks the ‘facts’ to be able to perform symbolic reasoning. Logically, then, empirical reasoning would seem more suitable. Keynes, for example, considers the impact of not being able to consider ‘all hypotheses’.

While the case against classically rationality seems sound, the argument leaves the way open for an alternative rationality, e.g. based on Whitehead and Keynes.

See Also

Later work

Better than rational, uncertainty aversion.

Other

Reasoning, mathematics.

Dave Marsay

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About Dave Marsay
Mathematician with an interest in 'good' reasoning.

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