Cyber Doctrine

Cyber Doctrine: Towards a coherent evolutionary framework for learning resilience, ISRS, JP MacIntosh, J Reid and LR Tyler.

A large booklet that provides a critical contribution to the Cyber debate. Here I provide my initial reactions: the document merits more detailed study.

Topics

Scope

Just as financial security is about more than just defending against bank-robbers, cyber security is about more than just defending against deliberate attack, and extends to all aspects of resilience, including freedom from whatever delusions might be analogous to the efficient market hypothesis.

Approach

Innovation is key to a vibrant Cyberspace and further innovation in Cyberspace is vital to our real lives. Thus a notion of security based on constraint or resilience based on always returning to the status quo are simply not appropriate. 

Resilience and Transformation

Resilience is defined as “the enduring power of a body or bodies for transformation, renewal and recovery through the flux of interactions and flow of events.” It is not just the ability to ‘bounce back’ to its previous state. It implies the ability to learn from events and adapt to be in a better position to face them.

Transformation is taken to be the key characteristic. It is not defined, which might lead people to turn to wikipedia, whose notion does not explicitly address complexity or uncertainty. I would like to see more emphasis on the long-run issues of adapting to evolve as against sequentially adapting to what one thinks the current needs are. This may include ‘deep transformation’ and ‘transformation in contact’ and the elimination of parts that are no longer needed.

Pragmatism 

The document claims to be ‘pragmatic’: I have concerns about what this term means to readers. According to wikipedia, “it describes a process where theory is extracted from practice, and applied back to practice to form what is called intelligent practice.” Fair enough. But the efficient market hypothesis was once regarded as pragmatic, and there are many who think it pragmatic to act as if one’s beliefs were true. Effective Cyber practice would seem to depend on an appropriate notion of pragmatism, which a doctrine perhaps ought to elucidate.

Glocalization

The document advocates glocalization. According to wikipedia this means ‘think global act local’ and the document refers to a variant: “the compression of the world and the intensification of the consciousness of the world as a whole”. But how should we conceive the whole? The document says “In cyberspace our lives are conducted through a kaleidoscope of global and local relations, which coalesce and dissipate as diverse glocals.” Thus this is not wholism (which supposes that the parts should be dominated by the needs of the whole) but a more holistic vision, which seeks a sustainable solution, somehow ‘balancing’ a range of needs on a range of scales. The doctrinal principles will need to support the structuring and balancing more explicitly.

Composability

The document highlights composability as a key aspect of best structural practice that – pragmatically – perhaps ought to be leveraged further. I intend to blog specifically on this. Effective collaboration is clearly essential to innovation, including resilience. Composability would seem essential to effective collaboration.

Visualisation: Quads

I imagine that anyone who has worked on these types of complex issue, with all their uncertainties, will recognize the importance of visual aids that can be talked around. There are many that are helpful when interpreted with understanding and discretion, but I have yet to find any that can ‘stand alone’ without risk of mis-interpretation. Diagram 6 (page 89) seems at first sight a valuable contribution to the corpus, worthy of further study and perhaps development.

I consider Perrow limited because his ‘yardstick’ tends to be an existing system and his recommendation seems to be ‘complexity and uncertainty are dangerous’. But if we want resilience through innovation we cannot avoid complexity and uncertainty. Further, glocalization seems to imply a turbulent diversity of types of coupling, such that Perrow’s analysis is impossible to apply.

I have come across the Johari window used in government as a way of explaining uncertainty, but here the yardstick is what others think they know, and in any case the concept of ‘knowledge’ seems just as difficult as that of uncertainty. So while this motivates, it doesn’t really explain.

The top ‘quad’ says something important about conventional economics. Much of life is a zero sum game: if I eat the cake, then you can’t. But resilience is about other aspects of life: we need a notion of rationality that suits this side of life. This will need further development.

Positive Deviancy and Education

 Lord Reid (below) made some comments when launching the booklet that clarify some of the issues. He emphasises the role for positive deviancy and education in the sense of ‘bringing out’. This seems to me to be vital.

Control and Patching

Lord Reid (below) emphasises that a control-based approach, or continual ‘patching’, aren’t enough. There is a qualitative change in the nature of Cyber, and hence a need for a completely different approach. This might have been made more explicit in the document.

Criticisms

The main criticisms that I have seen have been either of the recommendations that they wrongly assume John Reid is making (e.g., for more control) or appear to be based on a dislike of Lord Reid. In any case, changes such as those proposed would seem to call for a more international figure-head or lead institution, perhaps with ISRS in a supporting role.

What next?

The argument for having some doctrine matches my own leanings, as does the general trend of  the suggestions. But (as the government, below, says) one needs an international consensus, which in practice would seem to mean an approach endorsed by the UN security council (including America, France, Russia and China). Such a hopeless task seems to lead people to underestimate the risks of the status quo, or of ‘evolutionary’ patching of it with either less order or more control. As with the financial crisis, this may be the biggest threat to our security, let alone our resilience.

It seems to me, though, that behind the specific ideas proffered the underlying instincts are not all that different from those of the founders of the UN, and that seen in that context the ideas might not be too far from being attractive to each of the permanent members, if only the opportunities were appreciated.

Any re-invention or re-articulation of the principles of the UN would naturally have an impact on member states, and call for some adjustment to their legal codes. The UK’s latest Prevent strategy already emphasises the ‘fundamental values’ of ‘universal human rights, equality before the law, democracy and full participation in our society’.  In effect, we could see the proposed Cyber doctrine as proposing principles that would support a right to live in a reasonably resilient society. If for resilience we read sustainability, then we could say that there should be a right to be able to sustain oneself without jeopardising the prospects of one’s children and grandchildren. I am not sure what ‘full participation in our society’ would mean under reformed principles, but I see governments as having a role in fostering the broadest range of possible ‘positive deviants’, rather than (perhaps inadvertently) encouraging dangerous groupthink. These thoughts are perhaps prompted more by Lord Reid’s comments than the document itself.

Conclusion

 The booklet raises important issues about the nature, opportunities and threats of globalisation as impacted by Cyberspace. It seems clear that there is a consequent need for doctrine, but not yet what routes forward there may be. Food for thought, but not a clear prospectus.

See Also

Government position, Lord Reid’s Guardian article. , Police Led Intelligence, some negative comment.

Dave Marsay